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Who can provide Third Party Provider (TPP) services?

From 13 January 2018, companies that are authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), or another European regulator, can provide Account Information Services (AIS) or Payment Initiation Services (PIS).

If you have any doubts about whether a company is legitimate, you should ask them for more information, for example, who they are regulated by.

The FCA and other European Regulators will add AIS and PIS providers to the registers they keep of all authorised businesses. These registers will be publically available.

Please be aware that any companies that have been providing these services since before January 12 2016 do not need to be authorised by the FCA until the end of 2019, so may not appear on the FCA’s register until a later date.

Before you use one of these services, you should make sure that you understand the service and that you are happy with who will be providing it to you.

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    No, The Co-operative Bank does not currently offer its own Third Party Provider (TPP) services.
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