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By continuing to use the site you agree that we can save them on your device. Cookies are small text files which are placed on your computer and which remember your preferences/some details of your visit. Our cookies don’t collect personal information. For more information, please read our updated privacy and cookie policy, which also explains how to disable cookies if you wish to.

Romance fraud

Using dating websites to develop relationships is becoming increasingly common with more and more people accessing the ample availability of websites, chat rooms, and social media channels as a way of getting to know someone before considering meeting them.

Whilst there are lots of heartwarming stories of relationships formed on the internet, there are also a worrying number of stories about ruthless romance fraudsters who create fake profiles in an attempt to win a person’s affections and steal their money.

Fraudsters will use clever psychological tricks to gain the confidence and affections of legitimate site users including;

  • Being very attentive - ensuring there is regular, often daily contact via the internet 
  • When the trust has been gained they begin to ask for money
  • They may tell their victim that there has been a crisis; typically this is abroad and that they need money for flights to visit an ill relative, or to pay for their urgent treatment
  • They may say that they are being held hostage and need to meet the demands of their captors
  • In some cases they entice their victims with financial rewards, e.g. a small investment is guaranteed to double their return
  • Money is often requested to be transferred via a money gram service rather than through a personal account to disguise the identity of the receiver
  • Don't put yourself and your identity in jeopardy by trusting people too quickly, be cautious when getting to know people
  • guard your privacy and trust your instincts. If something doesn't feel right it probably isn't
  • Never send money or give credit card or online account details to anyone you don't know and trust

Break off all contact immediately and if you think you have been a victim of this scam and suffered a financial loss, call us on;

03457 212 212– for current account customers
0345 600 6000– for credit card customers
03457 213 213– for business banking customers