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Internet and Telephone Fraud

Fraudsters use social engineering techniques such as Phishing and Vishing to trick you into providing your banking login details and other sensitive information. Typically, you will receive a cold call, email, text or social media message that appears to be from your bank, police or other reputable organisation and aims to trick you into providing personal or security related information. You may unknowingly click on a link or attachment in an email which redirects you to a fake website, or installs malicious software known as Malware onto your PC. This enables the fraudster to steal your personal information and money.

What is it?

Fraudsters send bogus messages which appear to be authentic and from legitimate organisations. The messages usually contain links or attachments which, if accessed, will take you to a fake website and prompt you for your online banking details. The key difference with the fake site is that you will be asked to confirm your full security details, rather than the selected pieces of information.

The fraudsters then use your details to access your account(s) and steal your money.

Protect yourself

  • Download Trusteer Rapport Online Banking Security Software. One of the features of this free software includes a security alert if you try to access your internet banking login credentials on an unknown website.
  • Always use a leading antivirus software in conjunction with Trusteer Rapport and keep it up to date.  
  • Look out for indications that you are using a secure site; a key or padlock symbol and the address prefix https:/  If you are unsure don’t make the transaction or download any software until you can check it out or obtain advice.
  • If you want to validate an email, text or social media message, use contact details obtained from a reliable source.
  • Never respond to a message from an unknown source, and take care not to click any embedded links.  Clicking the embedded link can provide verification of your active email address which could result in you being a target for further malicious emails.
  • Don’t use links in an email, text or social media message to load a web page. Always input the web address into the browser.
  • Only respond to expected email requests.

Top Tip! You can hover your mouse pointer over hyperlinks (or buttons) to see the underlying website URL.

What is it?

The term Vishing comes from combining ‘voice’ with ‘phishing’. This method of social engineering involves the fraudster telephoning you claiming to be from the Bank, Police or other reputable organisation in an attempt to obtain your personal information and steal your money.

Protect yourself

  • Do not assume a call is genuine because they know your name, or other personal information such as your postal address.
  • Say no to requests for information, don’t be afraid to terminate the call.
  • Do not assume a call is genuine by the caller ID information. Fraudsters often clone the telephone number of the organisation they want to impersonate and make it appear on the caller ID display of the individual's phone.
  • If you want to validate a phone call use contact details obtained from a reliable source, and always use a different telephone line to ensure that you don’t unknowingly speak to the fraudster again (who may attempt to  keep your phone line open).  Expect the usual waiting messages and timescales when calling a contact centre.
  • Never respond to requests asking you to confirm your PIN, or requests to collect your bank card from your home address.  We will never ask you to do this.
  • Never respond to a request to transfer your funds to another Bank, even if the caller advises you that you need to urgently move your money to a ‘safe’ bank account.  We will never ask you to do this.

What is it?

Malware is malicious financial software which steals your personal and security information and feeds the information back to the fraudster, who uses the details to access your account(s) and steal your money.

Malware can attack all customers and can be so sophisticated that it can work in the background to move your money, or trick you into believing that you have been unsuccessful in logging onto your online banking page, and prompts you to re-enter your security details, which the fraudster captures.

Malware includes; viruses, worms, trojan horses, spyware, scareware, crimeware and ransomware.

Protect yourself

  • Download Trusteer Rapport Online Banking Security Software. One of the features of this free software includes a security alert if you try to access your internet banking login credentials on an unknown website.
  • Always use a legitimate antivirus software in conjunction with Trusteer Rapport and keep it up to date.  
  • Look out for indications that you are using a secure site; a key or padlock symbol and the address prefix https:/  If you are unsure don’t make the transaction or download any software until you can check it out or obtain advice.
  • Be careful if you are asked to re-enter your security credentials or if you see any unusual screens, these could be an indication of malware.
  • Be vigilant to system outage messages within your login session, e.g. ‘Internet Banking is unavailable between 14.00-17.00’.  This is likely to be a legitimate message from us but could be a fraudulent message, always be cautious.
  • Check online banking payments before confirming to ensure they are going to the right recipient.

Call Us

03457 212 212 – for current account customers
0345 600 6000 – for credit card customers
03457 213 213 – for business banking customers

Forward any emails onto:Ihaveseenascam@co-operativebank.co.uk

Remember we will never…

  • Send you an email, text or social media message containing a link to a login page.
  • Contact you by phone, email, text or social media to ask you to confirm sensitive details or security details in full.
  • Advise you by email, phone, text or social media that your money needs to be moved to a ‘safe’ account.
  • Ask you for your PIN or send a courier to your home to collect/replace your card or PIN.
  • Call you to ask you to use your Card Reader to set up, make or amend any payments or contact you to ask you to use your Card Reader to confirm your identity.

Call us immediately if any of the above happens to you.