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By continuing to use the site you agree that we can save them on your device. Cookies are small text files which are placed on your computer and which remember your preferences/some details of your visit. Our cookies don’t collect personal information. For more information, please read our updated privacy and cookie policy, which also explains how to disable cookies if you wish to.

Latest Alerts

Financial Fraud Action UK – Royal Mail Email Scam Alert (June 2015)

Fraudsters are circulating two scam emails claiming to be from Royal Mail. Both state that they are holding a letter or parcel for the victim and that a response to the email is required to arrange for it to be resent or collected. The emails contain a link which when accessed infects the victims’ computer with malicious malware, enabling the fraudster to encrypt files. The fraudster will then demand payments from the victim for the encryption to be removed.

How to avoid becoming a victim of this scam:

  • Never click on an email link or attachment contained in unsolicited emails
  • Always use a legitimate contact number or website to validate a message

If you think you may have fallen victim to fraud or notice any unusual activity on your account please contact us immediately.

Financial Fraud Action UK – Spoof Text Warning

Fraudsters are sending spoof text messages claiming to be from the recipient’s bank in an attempt to steal their personal or financial information. The text messages claim that fraud has been identified on their account or that their account details need to be updated.  A variation on the scam is a text message which states that the recipient will soon be receiving a call from their bank’s fraud department.

To make the texts appear authentic, fraudsters use specialist software so that the caller ID displays the name of the bank as the sender.  The texts aim to create a sense of urgency to encourage the customer to call their ‘bank’ on a number provided, or visit a website. However, the telephone number or website is actually controlled by the fraudster, enabling them to obtain security details and steal the customer’s money.

How to avoid becoming a victim of this scam:

  • Be suspicious of a text message that asks you to provide sensitive personal information, passwords, or to make transactions
  • Always call your bank on a number that you trust, such as the one of the back of your card

Remember the Co-operative Bank will never:

  • Ask you to update your personal details by following a link in a text message or email
  • Contact you by any means and ask for your full security details or to divulge your PIN, even by tapping them into the telephone keypad
  • Ask you to check the number showing on your telephone display matches their registered telephone number
  • Send someone to your home to collect your card or PIN
  • Instruct you to move your money into a safe account

If you think you may have fallen victim to fraud or notice any unusual activity on your account please contact us immediately.

Vishing and Number Spoofing

Please be vigilant, some of our customers have reported experiencing fraudulent telephone calls.  These calls come from fraudsters who are attempting to steal your account funds by requesting that you move your money to a ‘safe’ or ‘secure’ account, or misleading you into providing your security details.

Fraudsters will do just about anything to gain your trust, including asking you to call them back to validate the call. They may stay on the line when you think the call is disconnected, or use a scam known as ‘number spoofing’ to trick you into believing that you are speaking to the bank or another trusted organisation.  They do this by drawing your attention to the number that appears on your caller ID display; this looks legitimate but has actually been changed to disguise the fraud.

If you are suspicious of the caller, use a different landline or mobile to call the bank.

If you are in any doubt as to the validity of a request to move your money, for information or you think that you may have revealed your security details, please contact us immediately.

Invoice Scams

Please be vigilant, there has been a spate of invoice fraud scams experienced across the banking industry aimed towards business customers.

Invoice fraud occurs when fraudsters trick you into altering the bank account details for regular automated payments, such as BACs and Standing Orders,  by posing as one of your regular suppliers.

These bogus requests may be made by letter, email or telephone.

Help protect yourself from this scam by:

  • Staying alert to any request to amend beneficiary account  details of a supplier
  • Verifying a request by contacting your supplier direct, using established contact details, before implementing a change
  • Reconciling accounts daily to help quickly identify potential fraudulent transactions
  • Adopting dual control procedures for authorising payments and regularly conducting audits on your accounts

If you think you may have fallen victim to fraud or notice any unusual activity on your account please contact us immediately.